Henry Cavill Eyes

June 17, 2013

Henry Cavill's heterochromia.  Image from flickr.com.
So my poor beleaguered husband and I went to watch Man of Steel on opening day.  It's a summer popcorn movie, and as such shouldn't be held to high standards of criticism.  Some of the action sequences were overkill and sometimes the plot just didn't make sense.  Also, someone needs to talk to the art director, because everything in this movie looked like a penis.  All of the alien conveyances looked like penises.  Amy Adams at one point even screamed, "It's supposed to go in all the way!"  When I laughed heartily, the lady sitting in front of me turned around and gave me a dirty, dirty look.  Whatever, lady.  Penises everywhere.

That said, I want to reiterate something that you have probably already figured out for yourself: Henry Cavill is a beautiful man.  There was a moment in the movie when even my husband turned to me and said, "Yes.  You are right.  That man is very handsome."

As I've enthusiastically mentioned before, Henry Cavill is a muse of mine.  I am basing the appearance of one of my heroes on him, but I'm changing a couple of details.  My hero is shorter than Henry, who is 6'2".  My hero is wirier than Henry, who got jacked to epic proportions for Man of Steel.  And like Henry, my hero has heterochromia iridum, a difference in coloration of the eye.  In some people, like David Bowie, the condition exists as a result of an injury; Bowie has one permanently dilated pupil, which for some reason strikes me as very rock and roll.

David Bowie's eyes.  Image from Black Cat Bone.
  
In others, like Henry, the condition is inherited.   He's got blue eyes (sigh), but the top portion of his left eye contains rays of brown.  Here's another photo, just to help you visualize this.

Do you see it?  Do you see the tiny bit of chocolate brown in his eye?  Image from Lipstick Alley.



  Maybe you need another photo.

Sweet Jesus.  Image from henrycavill.org.
Okay.  Whew.  I feel better now.  I am not sure why I find heterochromia so damn attractive.  Perhaps a tiny dose of asymmetry in an attractive face makes it just a little bit more striking.  Here's Kate Bosworth, another celebrity with heterochromia.

Kate Bosworth has heterochromia.  Image from Mad World.
For Sam, the hero I'm working on right now, heterochromia is hereditary, but his case is more extreme than Henry Cavill's or even Kate Bosworth's.  Sam's right eye is blue and his left is brown.  There are no variations in the iris, just two solid colors.  Last night I tracked down a photograph of someone who has this condition in real life.  It's Max Scherzer, pitcher for the Detroit Tigers.  Look at this:

Max Scherzer.  Image from the aptly-named Baseballers with Pretty Eyes.
It's kind of unsettling, isn't it?  I like it.  I think Sam will be a fun character.